Ryan Broderick's Cool Time Fun Blog

I work for Buzzfeed and do other internet things.
~ Tuesday, September 30 ~
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actual-drawings:

nahnichan:

『80年のダイジェスト』

oh god his vines are best

(Source: vine.co)


85,378 notes
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jpnvines:

お前だれ 〜 Hiyori

Who are you 〜 Hiyori

I’ll take a selfie… selfie~

Huh? Huh?

(Source: vine.co)


10,424 notes
reblogged via terrorboochan
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(Source: bewareofmpreg)


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jpnvines:

少女漫画 〜 ももてぃんこ

Shoujo manga 〜 ももてぃんこ

Okay, we’re gonna do a shoujo manga. 

No one else is on here. 

I wish we could just keep riding on, just the two of us. 

oh wow

(Source: vine.co)


10,709 notes
reblogged via what-is-this-i-dont-even
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concretefemme:

i realise a lot of people on tumlr don’t follow sports/particularly the nfl and that means a lot of people on tumlr have no reason to know that the San Diego Chargers’ mascot is this horrible being named Boltman that i am increasingly sure is @dril’s physical form


4,113 notes
reblogged via salvatriss
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dadcopter:

finally now i can feel even shittier after eating doritos

dadcopter:

finally now i can feel even shittier after eating doritos

(Source: kobekai)


5,567 notes
reblogged via what-is-this-i-dont-even
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memefuckery:

intellectualpizza:

memefuckery:

I had a hermit crab and a dollhouse…..

SWEET BABY JESUS I THOUGHT IT WAS A NORMAL HOUSE AND YOU HAD SOME SORT OF HUGE ASS CRUSTACEAN LIVING IN IT AND I ALMOST PASSED OUT

It’s okay, like 12 other people thought that

(Source: )


113,547 notes
reblogged via bookoisseur
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(Source: victorshinigami)


28,645 notes
reblogged via thug-shinji
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applegrass:

sadweens:

this party is invite only

is no one gonna mention that she’s on tumblr looking at a photo of the very fireplace she’s sitting in front of

applegrass:

sadweens:

this party is invite only

is no one gonna mention that she’s on tumblr looking at a photo of the very fireplace she’s sitting in front of

(Source: sadpretzel)


142,975 notes
reblogged via applegrass
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(Source: screenwack)


13,298 notes
reblogged via tenshihime13
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80,234 notes
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~ Monday, September 29 ~
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the90swerentreal:

Recent-ish photos from Brooklyn, Tennessee, and New Jersey. 


21 notes
reblogged via the90swerentreal
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scissor-happy:

It’s about time to break out my favorite eyeshadow.

scissor-happy:

It’s about time to break out my favorite eyeshadow.


26,668 notes
reblogged via qats
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celestialdefender:


"I read you loud and clear"

celestialdefender:

image

"I read you loud and clear"

(Source: daysrunaway)


5,611 notes
reblogged via what-is-this-i-dont-even
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kateoplis:

"The first thing I do is I dress for airports. I dress for security. I dress for the worst-case scenario. Comfortable shoes are important — I like Clarks desert boots because they go off and on very quickly, they’re super comfortable, you can beat the hell out of them, and they’re cheap.
In my carry-on, I’ll have a notebook, yellow legal pads, good headphones. Imodium is important. The necessity for Imodium will probably present itself, and you don’t want to be caught without it. I always carry a scrunchy lightweight down jacket; it can be a pillow if I need to sleep on a floor. And the iPad is essential. I load it up with books to be read, videos, films, games, apps, because I’m assuming there will be downtime. You can’t count on good films on an airplane. 
I check my luggage. I hate the people struggling to cram their luggage in an overhead bin, so I don’t want to be one of those people.
On the plane, I like to read fiction set in the location I’m going to. Fiction is in many ways more useful than a guidebook, because it gives you those little details, a sense of the way a place smells, an emotional sense of the place. So, I’ll bring Graham Greene’s The Quiet American if I’m going to Vietnam. It’s good to feel romantic about a destination before you arrive.” 
"I never, ever try to weasel upgrades. I’m one of those people who feel really embarrassed about wheedling. I never haggle over price. I sort of wander away out of shame when someone does that. I’m socially nonfunctional in those situations. 
I don’t get jet lag as long as I get my sleep. As tempting as it is to get really drunk on the plane, I avoid that. If you take a long flight and get off hungover and dehydrated, it’s a bad way to be. I’ll usually get on the plane, take a sleeping pill, and sleep through the whole flight. Then I’ll land and whatever’s necessary for me to sleep at bedtime in the new time zone, I’ll do that. 
There’s almost never a good reason to eat on a plane. You’ll never feel better after airplane food than before it. I don’t understand people who will accept every single meal on a long flight. I’m convinced it’s about breaking up the boredom. You’re much better off avoiding it. Much better to show up in a new place and be hungry and eat at even a little street stall than arrive gassy and bloated, full, flatulent, hungover. So I just avoid airplane food. It’s in no way helpful. 
For me, one of the great joys of traveling is good plumbing. A really good high-pressure shower, with an unlimited supply of hot water. It’s a major topic of discussion for me and my crew. Best-case scenario: a Japanese toilet. Those high-end Japanese toilets that sprinkle hot water in your ass. We take an almost unholy pleasure in that.”
"I’ve stopped buying souvenirs. The first few years I’d buy trinkets or T-shirts or handcrafts. I rarely do that anymore. My apartment is starting to look like Colonel Mustard’s club. So much of it comes out of the same factory in Taiwan.”
"The other great way to figure out where to eat in a new city is to provoke nerd fury online. Go to a number of foodie websites with discussion boards. Let’s say you’re going to Kuala Lumpur — just post on the Malaysia board that you recently returned and had the best rendang in the universe, and give the name of a place, and all these annoying foodies will bombard you with angry replies about how the place is bullshit, and give you a better place to go.”
Bourdain: How to Travel

kateoplis:

"The first thing I do is I dress for airports. I dress for security. I dress for the worst-case scenario. Comfortable shoes are important — I like Clarks desert boots because they go off and on very quickly, they’re super comfortable, you can beat the hell out of them, and they’re cheap.

In my carry-on, I’ll have a notebook, yellow legal pads, good headphones. Imodium is important. The necessity for Imodium will probably present itself, and you don’t want to be caught without it. I always carry a scrunchy lightweight down jacket; it can be a pillow if I need to sleep on a floor. And the iPad is essential. I load it up with books to be read, videos, films, games, apps, because I’m assuming there will be downtime. You can’t count on good films on an airplane. 

I check my luggage. I hate the people struggling to cram their luggage in an overhead bin, so I don’t want to be one of those people.

On the plane, I like to read fiction set in the location I’m going to. Fiction is in many ways more useful than a guidebook, because it gives you those little details, a sense of the way a place smells, an emotional sense of the place. So, I’ll bring Graham Greene’s The Quiet American if I’m going to Vietnam. It’s good to feel romantic about a destination before you arrive.” 

"I never, ever try to weasel upgrades. I’m one of those people who feel really embarrassed about wheedling. I never haggle over price. I sort of wander away out of shame when someone does that. I’m socially nonfunctional in those situations. 

I don’t get jet lag as long as I get my sleep. As tempting as it is to get really drunk on the plane, I avoid that. If you take a long flight and get off hungover and dehydrated, it’s a bad way to be. I’ll usually get on the plane, take a sleeping pill, and sleep through the whole flight. Then I’ll land and whatever’s necessary for me to sleep at bedtime in the new time zone, I’ll do that. 

There’s almost never a good reason to eat on a plane. You’ll never feel better after airplane food than before it. I don’t understand people who will accept every single meal on a long flight. I’m convinced it’s about breaking up the boredom. You’re much better off avoiding it. Much better to show up in a new place and be hungry and eat at even a little street stall than arrive gassy and bloated, full, flatulent, hungover. So I just avoid airplane food. It’s in no way helpful. 

For me, one of the great joys of traveling is good plumbing. A really good high-pressure shower, with an unlimited supply of hot water. It’s a major topic of discussion for me and my crew. Best-case scenario: a Japanese toilet. Those high-end Japanese toilets that sprinkle hot water in your ass. We take an almost unholy pleasure in that.”

"I’ve stopped buying souvenirs. The first few years I’d buy trinkets or T-shirts or handcrafts. I rarely do that anymore. My apartment is starting to look like Colonel Mustard’s club. So much of it comes out of the same factory in Taiwan.”

"The other great way to figure out where to eat in a new city is to provoke nerd fury online. Go to a number of foodie websites with discussion boards. Let’s say you’re going to Kuala Lumpur — just post on the Malaysia board that you recently returned and had the best rendang in the universe, and give the name of a place, and all these annoying foodies will bombard you with angry replies about how the place is bullshit, and give you a better place to go.”

Bourdain: How to Travel


1,288 notes
reblogged via kateoplis